Category Archives for "Community"

Post for/or about the Headlands Community interest.

First Planting of Charlotte’s Wood

Around 40 people came out today, the 26th February, 2022, to plant trees. 

This is the first planting of Charlotte's Wood, eventually a 130 acre forest. This is a major reforestation project to reclaim an old quarry site.

We plan to plant 3000-5000 trees each year until it is full.

Thanks everyone who came out today, we planted over 1200 trees.
#charlotteswood

Headlands Esplanade Bridge Install

A major milestone took place yesterday (16/2/22) at Headlands with the install of the arches for the bridge across the gully at the foot of the wetlands. Eight arches came up by truck, two per truck. We had two large cranes and a lot of frantic workers.

There was rain, wind and sunshine but the weather didn’t deter everyone from doing their jobs. And a job well done it was. This is an integral part of the Headlands Green Stage.

We have a few more components to go to complete the bridge so we can back fill and complete Headlands Esplanade.

This video is a little long but worth it to see how it all came together.

The Yarning Circle

Yarning Circle at Bargara Headlands

What is a Yarning Circle and why do we have one at Bargara Headlands Estate?

Two very good questions. We will try and explain how this structure has come about.

WHAT IS A YARNING CIRCLE?

A Yarning Circle was used commonly by Indigenous tribes and was used for different things according to their traditions. Generally though it was a place where our first nations peoples came to discuss matters and make decisions. It represents a sacred and safe space where people can communicate and work out differences.

WHY AT BARGARA HEADLANDS ESTATE?

The land along this coast originally belonged to the Taribelang - Bunda peoples. Through an association with some of the local descendants of these people, the developer, Bill Moorhead, had a vision of a building them a Yarning Circle on the coast at Bargara Headlands Estate.

Rocks are abundant along our basalt coastline. So Bill decided to celebrate these rocks (some over 10tons)  by using them to build a Yarning Circle. After suggestions from the elders, adjustments were made and the site now feels like its been there forever.